This is the original photograph and the final edit I’ve chosen for my environmental portrait. I chose this edit because I like the focus I got with the camera, and I worked with the original image more closely to get the right kind of lighting. 

Although most of the images I took were of my father actually playing the guitar, my favourite image is this one, in which the guitar is simply paced on his lap, and his expression is very natural. 

Originally the image I was going to use as my final photograph was the one on the bottom left. However, after receiving feedback on this image I edited the image in several different styles, changing the lighting and adjusting the focus using photoshop.

After deciding on the text, I played around with the position of the title, and picked these two out as my favourite positions. After asking several people their opinion on the position of the text, I’ve decided to go with the image on the right, with the text at the bottom of the frame. I prefer this because it does not distract from the image, and with the text lower down there is more emphasis on the fire in her hair.

This is the original still life image I chose to use and the final image after I’ve edited it. I chose this image because I like the way the ribbons cascade through the frame, and go off the edges of the image. I lightened the shoes and cleaned them up a little, making sure they still had a worn look, but not so much that they were unappealing to look at. 

I edited the book cover to look like this, and after being happy with the image I produced I started experimenting with different styles of text. I originally started out using The Hunger Games original font, although as the image I’ve produced is quite defiant, I decided I didn’t want the text to overshadow this with its hardness. The next text I tried was thinner, and while I like how it looks I decided that it’s too weak to use as the title font. The third text is thin but rugged, and while I think this is still too thin, I liked the less refined style of the text. The fourth font is by far the best, as it is thick but still grungy, and I feel it reflects the themes in the book adequately, without overshadowing the image on the book.

I took my still life images over a few sittings, using a black background and a lamp to highlight the shoes. I experimented with different positions with the shoes, placing them together, having someone hang them directly under the lamp, and having one hang over the other, with the ribbons cascading in and out of the frame.

This is the contact sheet for my environmental portrait. To begin with, my exposure was not nearly long enough, so I made it as long as I could without compromising the quality of the image. I used a standing light as a spotlight, alongside the ceiling lights in the room. Most of the images I took were of my father playing the guitar, but as my exposure time was so long his hand was always out of focus, and I don’t want this on my final image, so I will probably end up using an image in which he is merely holding his guitar.

This is the final image I have chosen for my Pastiche, before and after editing. After many tries in the studio to get the lighting to fall on my subject’s face just like the original image, I decided to focus more on getting the lighting to fall correctly on the left half of my subject’s face, and work around his facial structure on the right side by getting the light to highlight his cheekbones and let the rest of his face fall into shadow. 

This is a contact sheet of the images I took for my pastiche. The lighting was difficult to replicate at first, and it only really takes shape in the last few shots. The fill light was not needed in the end, and it took several tries to get the umbrella light in the correct position. This was made more difficult as the shape of my subject’s face was not as angular as the face shape of the subject in the image I am replicating, so getting the lighting perfect proved impossible. 

I’ve chosen this Rankin image of Ian Brown to use for my pastiche. The lighting appears to be one umbrella light used up close from the top left, and possibly one low wattage fill light. I am using this image because I love the contrast between the background and the left side of his face especially. The way his face is so light in the image next to the back of the background is visually stunning, and I think it will be fun yet challenging to try and recreate this lighting and this level of contrast within my final image.

I’ve chosen this Rankin image of Ian Brown to use for my pastiche. The lighting appears to be one umbrella light used up close from the top left, and possibly one low wattage fill light. I am using this image because I love the contrast between the background and the left side of his face especially. The way his face is so light in the image next to the back of the background is visually stunning, and I think it will be fun yet challenging to try and recreate this lighting and this level of contrast within my final image.

These are the images I’ve chosen to use on my book cover. I’ve chosen these fire images because I like the shapes the flames make, and think they are a good shape to be able to weave into my book cover. I’ve chosen to use this image of Sarah because I like the way the shadow falls on her face, and think it will be one of the easier ones to manipulate to get the kind of visual I want for my book cover.

This contact sheet shows the images I selected from all the ones I took as kind of a shortlist to use in my book cover. I’ve decided that I want to go with my idea of using the image of a girl as the main part of my bookcover, and keeping her somewhat anonymous, which is why I took images from different positions with harsh lighting, and also posed my subject with her hair covering her face, so I can experiment with different styles or my book cover.

I also took many photos of a lit match to gather images of fire to weave into my book cover, using a high shutter speed to back out the background, making it easier to cut out the fire.

I’ve been looking at photographic still life on DeviantArt from different artists who’ve used pointe shoes as their subject. I wanted to see how other photographers have handled them as a subject, and how they have lit the shoes and used them in relation to other objects. After looking at these images, I’ve decided not to use any other objects in my photo, and to use a completely plain background so as not to take away from my subject. I also don’t want to bind my shoes with the ribbon, but make it so they flow through the image, while keeping the actual shoes as the main focus of the image.

Because I want to do a fine art still life piece, I’ve looked at some of the most famous still life photographers, and how they worked with lighting and their subject.

First I looked Edward Weston. I know some of his most famous images are those of the peppers, and his clever lighting style, but for the image I want to produce I was more interested in looking at his work with shells, particularly the image in the top left. I like how minimalist the image is, and how harsh the shell looks against the black background. I like how this brings out the texture in the shell because the black background accentuates the shadows the ridges create in comparison to the bright white of the shell.

After Ed Weston, I looked at two other still life photographic artists: Irving Penn and Karl Blossfeldt. It’s Irving Penn’s mushrooms which interest me most from his body of work - I like how there are very few greys in the image, and the very stark contrast between the white mushrooms and the dark background. This is also what I like about Karl Blossfeldt’s work, only of course in reverse. I love the tones in the bottom right image, and how the shadow on the flower contrasts heavily in comparison to the white background.

Much like these images, I want to create a stark contrast between my subject and the background, making my pointe shoes stand out against their background.

For my still life project, I’ve looked at two prominent pieces of historical media in relation to ballet. These are the Degas dance paintings and also The Red Shoes movie stills. 

I’ve looked at the Degas paintings because they are a classic example of ballet in art history, and I want to create a fine art photographic image, rather than a commercial image for my final piece. From this, I then looked at stills from The Red Shoes, as there is obviously more of a focus on pointe shoes, and this is what I intend to photograph. I like how because the shoes are red they stand out a lot in the images they are in because their colour is so bold. I will try and use this in my still life somehow, and make my pointe shoes stand out in the images by using a contrasting background, or by lighting them in a way that leaves no room to consider any other part of my final image.